Sorin wins FDA nod for cardiac monitor

Sorin won FDA approval for its SmartView home patient monitor.--Courtesy of Sorin

Sorin picked up the FDA's blessing to market its SmartView remote monitoring system, which allows physicians to keep tabs on patients with implanted cardiac devices while they're at home.

The system works in concert with Sorin's Paradym line of ICDs and CRT-Ds--which the company launched stateside last year--transmitting alerts and cardiac data to physicians and nurses without the need for a hospital visit.

Sorin's implants already minimize unwanted right ventricular pacing and offer the lowest recorded inappropriate shock rate of anything on the market, the company said, so adding remote patient monitoring will help the Italian devicemaker expand its U.S. market share.

"The introduction of SmartView remote monitoring in the United States is an important milestone for Sorin as we seek to extend our innovative technology offerings to more U.S. healthcare providers and patients," Sorin CRM President Stefano Di Lullo said in a statement. "We believe our intelligent devices and first-rate remote monitoring capabilities and service will continue to help us grow our business in the United States while, most importantly, saving lives and improving patient symptoms."

Like every other player in the CRM space, Sorin is looking to reverse a flagging market and change its fortunes in cardiac implants. The company is counting on an expanded slice of the U.S. market to make up for pricing pressures in Europe and Asia, expecting between 3% and 5% growth in CRM this year, and Sorin projects as much as a 30% leap in net profit for 2013.

Last year, the company posted a 3.1% drop in CRM revenue, due largely to last May's crippling earthquake in the biomedical hub of Mirandola.

- read the announcement

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