Upstart intros connected device to fight prescription drug abuse, encourage adherence

Solo Technology Holdings has introduced iKeyp, a connected device aimed at fighting prescription drug abuse and theft.

IKeyp is similar to a traditional safe. Users can place up to 8 standard prescription bottles inside of the safe and lock it. The device has a water-resistant digital keypad where users input their four- to 8-digit combination. Patients can also use a mobile app to access their medication.

To help with prescription adherence, the device can connect to the internet and communicate with users in near real time. The device offers security alerts and medication reminders via text, email or the iKeyp mobile app.

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IKeyp can still be used without the mobile app and has physical alerts built into the device itself. Above the keypad are three status lights that show internet connectivity, battery life and alert status. IKepy also features audible alerts that can be heard from the safe itself, and can be controlled with the keypad. Lastly, the device does have a failsafe key entry. 

IKeyp also features a humidity-resistant sealed door. Often, individuals opt to store their medications in a bathroom, which comes with high moisture levels. IKeyp’s seal helps to limit degradation from humidity and in turn could maximize effectiveness and lifespan.

While iKeyp can help with prescription adherence and storage, Solo’s main goal is to fight prescription drug theft and abuse.

"The abuse of prescription medication, particularly pain relievers such as opioids, is rampant in America and must be abated,” said Jeffrey Hermann, the founder and CEO of Solo, in the announcement. “It is destroying families and communities, and at the same time significantly increasing healthcare costs across the country. It is imperative that we do all that we can to stop the problem where it often begins: in the home.”

The announcement noted that according to the CDC, 129 individuals die each day in the U.S. from drug overdose. More than 87 of those deaths are from opioid abuse and half of those opioids are prescribed.

"The path leading to prescription drug abuse is clear and personal medication security is essential to stopping the epidemic," Hermann said. "Ninety-seven percent of the population does not secure their medications. The problem is that no one has until now offered a simple solution for consumers to safely store their medications and at the same time easily access them to maintain medication adherence.”

Hermann noted that iKeyp aims to be that simple solution. However, Solo is aware that this one device won’t entirely solve the problem, and thus has partnered with The Stutman Switalski Group, a substance abuse prevention program provider.

"We are aware that we can't single-handedly solve the epidemic and are dedicated to collaborating with communities and coalitions throughout the United States to tackle all facets of this issue,” said Mitch Danzig, president and COO of Solo, in the announcement.

"From DXM cough syrup to benzos to Oxycodone, some of the most commonly abused drugs are the most prescribed in America and are likely sitting in your medicine cabinet," said Robert Stutman. "Drugs are devastating our communities, homes and workplaces, and I believe we are failing as a country to deal with this in a way that will make any substantial change. The iKeyp is an example of a simple solution that could have substantial results in combating opioid abuse."

IKeyp is set to launch on Indiegogo this fall.

- here's the release

Related Articles:
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