Quintiles, LGL pair to offer pharmacogenetics solutions

Quintiles has inked a non-exclusive deal with London Genetics Limited to offer the pharmaceutical industry pharmacogenetics solutions to advance personalized medicine. Financial terms of the deal were not disclosed.

The partners will collaborate to help biopharma companies take advantage of pharmacogenetic solutions, including novel biomarker and assay development services. By providing biopharma companies strategic advice on the application of pharmacogenetics and innovative pharmacogenetics solutions, Quintiles and LGL can help customers access additional resources and speed the delivery of targeted treatments.

"Our expertise in pharmacogenetic strategy development combined with Quintiles' expertise and infrastructure in biomarker development gives biopharma companies a powerful ally in harnessing the value of genomic data for drug development," says LGL CEO Dominique Kleyn in a statement. "Ultimately, our alliance will support biopharma in their interactions with academic partners and in the development of personalized medicines."

Quintiles develops proprietary and novel biomarker tests analyzing genes and proteins that affect cell growth and mutation, and performs these assays at labs in the U.S., Scotland and China. LGL, a not-for-profit company, is an expert in the use of pharmacogenetics in clinical drug discovery and development. Established in 2007, its seven founding partners are leading London academic and medical institutions with clinical and genetic expertise and significant patient resources.

- get the Quintiles release

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