Patient monitoring company expanding in Milwaukee, adding 150 jobs

Mortara's TM55/65 medical treadmill for cardiac stress testing--Courtesy of Mortara

Mortara Instrument, a maker of heart monitoring devices, is expanding its manufacturing and distribution operations in Milwaukee, WI. The creation of a 64,000-square-foot facility near its headquarters will create 150 jobs over the next 5 years, the company says.

The Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation will provide up to $700,000 in tax credits, assuming the jobs are created, reports the Milwaukee Business Journal.

"I am proud of our continued growth and our increasing prominence in the market and in our community," said CEO Justin Mortara in the article. "We're excited to further invest in our community and truly live out our promise that all Mortara products are 'Built with Pride in Milwaukee.'"

Mortara employs 400 people globally, including 200 in Milwaukee. It's added 150 jobs since May 2013, following the acquisition of Cardiac Science's diagnostic cardiology unit for an undisclosed sum. Devices made by Mortara include ECGs, stress testing treadmills and equipment and Holter monitors.

The company is making efforts to ensure its products are compatible with IT, no surprise in the era of Big Data.

Earlier this year, the company teamed up with electronic health records player Cerner to launch a system for displaying data from patient monitoring systems and integrating it with electronic health records. And in December, the FDA cleared its WiFi-enabled mobile ECG monitor. That month the agency also gave Mortara permission to use its ambulatory blood pressure monitor in pediatric patients, in addition to adults.

- read more in the Milwaukee Bussines Journal

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