Neuros Medical reports positive results from pain study

Ohio-based Neuros Medical has reported promising results from the first human test of its high frequency Electrical Nerve Block technology in patients with chronic amputation pain. The technology focuses on eliminating chronic pain in a variety of applications including neuroma/residual limb pain, chronic post surgical pain and chronic migraine, according to the company's website.

During the study, four of the five patients reported their pain was reduced to zero, the company says in a statement. One patient reported being able to sleep pain-free through the night for the first time in years, while another said his pain was reduced so much that he could work in woodworking shop for hours.

"Providing such significant pain relief for the patients is outstanding," according to Dr. Amol Soin of the Kettering Health Network Innovation Center and the Ohio Pain Clinic. "A complete reduction is often unheard of, however the high frequency electrical nerve block technology showed the ability to do so, safely and consistently, and the strong potential it holds for patients suffering from chronic pain is very encouraging," he adds in a statement.

Neuros President and CEO Jon Snyder said the company will present more findings at the International Neuromodulation Society 10th World Congress in London in May.

Neuros was founded in October 2008, gaining seed funding JumpStart and Case Technology Ventures in March 2009. Mass Device reported last July that Neuros had plans to double--or even triple--its employment as it utilized a $1.5 million Defense Department grant to speed development of its neurostimulation device.

- get the Neuros Medical release

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