Missouri woman sues Johnson & Johnson for transvaginal mesh complications

Yet another lawsuit accuses Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ) of safety problems with its transvaginal mesh products.

Gilman Law filed a U.S. District Court lawsuit on behalf of a Missouri woman who says she suffered from severe complications after getting J&J/Ethicon's Gynecare Gynemesh transvaginal mesh device implanted, causing the need for two more painful surgeries.

Transvaginal mesh implants have been under fire for a while now because of increased safety concerns, and in June, J&J/Ethicon stopped selling four of its products in the face of hundreds of other lawsuits challenging the products' safety. But J&J said it would seek FDA permission to keep selling Gynecare Gynemesh with a new, more restrictive label.

The FDA has also ordered vaginal mesh manufacturers including C.R. Bard ($BCR), Covidien ($COV), Boston Scientific ($BSX) and others to pursue three years of studies in order to gather additional data that shows how save and effective the mesh implants are. But as Gilman Law points out in its lawsuit announcement, the devices, used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence, have been under fire for at least four years. The FDA issued a public health warning in October 2008 that they could erode, cause infection and urinary problems, or lead to a relapse of the conditions that created a need for the implant in the first place.

Bard, J&J, Boston Scientific and American Medical Systems are among companies facing consolidated lawsuits involving their transvaginal mesh products and the safety problems plaintiffs say they caused.

- read the release

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