Jan Medical nabs $3.15M in Series A

Mountain View, CA-based Jan Medical has received $3.15 million in a Series A funding round led by Germany's Brainlab. The funding will be used for two clinical trials and the subsequent filing of two product 510(k)s with the FDA.

According to its website, Jan has developed the first and only portable brain sensing system to detect ischemic stroke. Clinical data related to the company's system was recently reported at during the annual scientific meeting of the Society of Interventional Radiology. "Jan's brain sensing system has the potential to dramatically improve the way stroke is diagnosed and monitored," according to principal investigator Eric Aldrich. "Time is of the essence in preserving brain function during stroke and this technology promises to uniquely provide critical information on a timely basis both in the ER and in the Neurocritical care unit."

Back in May, KGO-TV reported on the device, which is based on technology used to interpret sonar. It is sensitive enough to determine the type and location of individual strokes, something that help prevent permanent damage from loss of oxygen to the brain. "Our system is fast, it can get a diagnosis in something under 90 seconds," company CEO Paul Lovoi told the station.

And Joseph Doyle, Brainlab's CFO, expressed enthusiasm for the technology in a statement. "Jan Medical is introducing an entirely new field of diagnostics that can impact everything from patient triage to surgical treatment." 

Jan hopes to be able to apply for FDA clearance of the device as early as next year, according to KGO.

- get the Jan Medical release
- read the KGO report, with video

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