Florida startup nabs CE mark for antimicrobial, intravenous UV light therapy

UVLrx Treatment System--Courtesy of UVLrx

UVLrx Therapeutics has secured a CE mark for its intravenous UV light therapeutic system across a wide variety of indications. The use of ultraviolet blood irradiation stretches back over a century, but fell out of favor with the rise of antibiotics in the 1950s. This system, dubbed UVLrx 1500, is designed to be used without removing the blood from the body.

The device incorporates several wavelengths of LED-based light including ultraviolet-A (UVA) as well as multiple additional, visible light wavelengths. It's the first such intravenous device to concurrently use several kinds of light, the company said.

Red light has anti-inflammatory and immune system-boosting capabilities, while green light has been shown to improve red blood cell function. UVA has a potent antimicrobial effect.

The CE mark covers a broad range of indications including reduction of pain, blood pathogens and inflammation as well as immune system modulation and improved ATP synthesis, wound healing, blood oxygen transport and circulation.

The various wavelengths of light are delivered concurrently via a standard one-inch, 20-gauge IV catheter, since the skin inhibits the penetration of the light to the blood. The Oldsmar, FL-based company was founded in 2011.

"We are pleased to have received the CE mark and are bringing the UVLrx 1500 System to the European market," said UVLrx President and CEO Michael Harter in a statement. "The breadth of indications covered by our CE points to a bright future for this treatment and for the patients who will benefit from the technology."

- here is the announcement

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