Elenza garners $24M for implantable ocular lens

Roanoke, VA-based Elenza has rounded up $24 million to support development and commercialization of its Electro-active AutoFocal Intraocular Lens (ILO). The money will also be used to fund the regulartory work necessary to obtain CE mark in Europe and other international markets. The company's original investors--The Carlyle Group and Delphi Ventures--were joined by new investor Itochu Corporation and an unnamed corporate investor. This is the first round of financing the company has raised since 2008.

Elenza's ILO technology seeks to correct near, intermediate and distance vision. According to a company statement, its lens uses chemistry, electricity and integrated-circuitry to create smart optics, resulting in improved vision for the patient. The lens is controlled by a micro-sized power-cell with an expected 50-plus year rechargeable cycle life.

"We see great promise in ELENZA's next generation Accommodating IOL technology and we are pleased to follow on our initial investment with strong corporate strategic and financial partners to fund product development, while ultimately setting the course for clinical approvals and future commercialization," said Jim Bochnowski, General Partner of Delphi Ventures. Elenza plans to open an office Zürich, Switzerland in the Spring of 2011.

- here's Elenza's release

ALSO: Led by New Enterprise Associates Arizona-based Ulthera has completed $10.5 million in Series C venture funding. The company's technology, cleared by the FDA in 2009, uses ultrasound technology to lift and tone and tone skin noninvasively. Release

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