Delcath selects Ireland as European base; Tornier sees ex-U.S. commercial release of Simpliciti;

> Delcath Systems has reported it will base its European operations in Galway, Ireland. It also has formed Delcath Systems Limited, an Irish company through which it will establish its European ops. Delcath Limited will receive financial support from IDA Ireland--an agency dedicated to attracting foreign investment to the country--to support initial hiring and marketing. Delcath release

> Tornier had good news to report this week. The first patient has been enrolled and treated successfully with the Simpliciti prosthesis as part of an FDA IDE clinical study. And the company announced the commercial release of the Simpliciti system outside the U.S. Tornier release

> The first Scenaria CT scanner has been installed in North America and is available for clinical use at Radiology Imaging Associates in Prince Frederick, MD, Hitachi Medical Systems America said this week. Hitachi release

> Minnesota's Cardia, which develops transcatheter septal occluders to repair congenital heart defects, has raised $2.08 million, according to a regulatory filing. Report

> Software added to cellphones has aided diabetes patients significantly reduce a key measure of blood sugar over a year, according to a study. "Mobile health has the potential to help patients better self-manage any chronic disease, not just diabetes," said lead researcher Charlene Quinn, who is an assistant professor of epidemiology and public health at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. News

And Finally... Dieters may soon be thanking two Clemson researchers, who have invented a device--known as the Bite Counter--that is worn on the wrist like a watch to help combat mindless eating. Story

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