VBL Therapeutics to Present at the UBS Global Life Sciences Conference

TEL AVIV, Israel--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- VBL Therapeutics, a clinical-stage biotechnology company committed to the development of novel treatments for immune-inflammatory diseases and cancer, today announced that Dror Harats, M.D., chief executive officer of VBL, is scheduled to present at the UBS Global Life Sciences Conference on Wednesday, September 22, 2010 at 12:00 p.m. EDT at the Grand Hyatt New York.

Dr. Harats is expected to discuss the company’s business strategy, and preclinical and clinical progress with VBL’s innovative portfolio of first-in-class treatments for immune-inflammatory diseases and cancer. Dr. Harats will also outline the company’s goals to advance the clinical development of VB-201 in psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as VB-111 in certain cancers in 2010.

About VBL Therapeutics

VBL Therapeutics is an innovative, clinical-stage biotechnology company committed to the development of novel treatments for immune-inflammatory diseases and cancer. VBL has pioneered the Lecinoxoid class of oral anti-inflammatory agents and VB-201 is the lead candidate from this program, which has entered Phase 2 clinical development in patients with psoriasis. In addition, VBL has a proprietary Vascular Targeting System (VTS™) technology platform that has yielded VB-111, the first dual-action, anti-angiogenic and vascular disruptive agent (VDA) for cancer, which is expected to enter Phase 2 clinical trials in 2010. VBL is based in Tel Aviv, Israel and has more than 62 granted patents and more than 115 patents pending. For more information on the company, please visit www.vblrx.com.



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Pure Communications
Dan Budwick, 973-271-6085

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  New York  Middle East  Israel

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