Teva to Present at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Health Care Conference

JERUSALEM--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (Nasdaq: TEVA) will host a live audio webcast at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Health Care Conference with Shlomo Yanai, President & Chief Executive Officer, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., presenting on Thursday, May 13, 2010 in New York.

 

What:

  Teva Presentation at the Bank of America Merrill Lynch Annual Health Care Conference
 

Who:

Shlomo Yanai, President & Chief Executive Officer, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
 

When:

Thursday, May 13, 2010 at 10:40 AM (ET)
 

Where:

https://www.veracast.com/webcasts/bas/healthcare2010/id11345780.cfm or
http://www.tevapharm.com/financial/

 

How:

Live over the Internet -- log on to the Web at the address above and register for the event (approx. 10 minutes before). An archive of the webcast will be available on Teva's website.
 

About Teva

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., headquartered in Israel, is among the top 15 pharmaceutical companies in the world and is the leading generic pharmaceutical company. The company develops, manufactures and markets generic and innovative pharmaceuticals and active pharmaceutical ingredients. Over 80 percent of Teva's sales are in North America and Western Europe.



CONTACT:

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd.
Elana Holzman, 972 (3) 926-7554
or
Teva North America
Kevin Mannix, 215-591-8912

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  New York  Middle East  Israel

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Health  Biotechnology  Pharmaceutical  Other Health  Communications  Public Relations/Investor Relations  General Health

MEDIA:

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