Release of Cytopia Abstract for CYT997 Oral Presentation at American Society of Clinical Oncology

MELBOURNE, Australia, May 15 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Cytopia Limited (ASX: CYT) today announced that the abstract for its upcoming oral presentation on CYT997 at the 2008 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) will be accessible to the public via ASCO's website (www.asco.org) from 9pm on Thursday 15 May (US EDT).

The oral presentation, entitled "Phase I evaluation of CYT997, a novel cytotoxic and vascular disrupting agent, in patients with advanced cancer" will be presented to the meeting by Dr Jason Lickliter, Clinical Study Chairman on 2 June 2008.

The meeting, to be held in Chicago, attracts more than 30,000 delegates from around the world.

About CYT997

CYT997 is a vascular disrupting agent (VDA) with a dual mechanism of action that shuts down established blood vessels supplying the tumor with nutrients and oxygen as well as being a general cytotoxic agent. The compound, which was discovered by Cytopia in 2003, can be delivered orally as well as intravenously and was the subject of a successful IND application to the US Food and Drug Administration in 2005. Phase I and Phase II clinical studies with CYT997 in different oncology settings are currently underway.

About Cytopia

Cytopia Ltd is an Australian biotechnology company focused on the discovery and development of new drugs to treat cancer and other diseases. Cytopia conducts its research and development via subsidiaries based in Melbourne, Australia and New York and specializes in discovering new molecules with an improved therapeutic profile for the treatment of cancer.

Website: www.cytopia.com.au

SOURCE Cytopia Limited

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