Purdue Research Foundation names new assistant vice president for technology transfer

Purdue Research Foundation names new assistant vice president for technology transfer
April 26, 2010


WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. - Purdue Research Foundation officials announced Monday (April 26) that Elizabeth "Libby" Hart-Wells of New Market, Md., has been named assistant vice president and director of the Office of Technology Commercialization.

 
Hart-Wells, who most recently served as executive director of Commercial Ventures and Intellectual Property at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, will begin her position in mid-May.

The foundation's Office of Technology Commercialization serves Purdue University faculty, students and staff through the commercialization of their discoveries and inventions. In 2008 the university generated a record $333.4 million in sponsored research funding and $3.4 million in royalties. The office also filed 227 invention disclosures and received 24 issued patents.

"Our Office of Technology Commercialization is one of the most comprehensive technology transfer programs among leading research universities in the U.S.," said Joseph B. Hornett, senior vice president, treasurer and COO of the Purdue Research Foundation. "Libby brings a wealth of experience to the position, particularly in the commercialization of intellectual property, patent analysis and business development. She is the right person to lead this important office and to bring new ideas and vision that will enhance it even more." 

Hart-Wells' responsibilities for the Purdue Research Foundation will include supervising the department's innovation strategy managers; reviewing license agreements; promoting the patenting, disclosures and development of discoveries; supporting initiatives for faculty startup companies; and overseeing compliance with federal technology regulation.

"I look forward to joining the Purdue Research Foundation team and leading the Office of Technology Commercialization in their pursuit of excellence to meet the university's mission of discovery, meeting global challenges and promoting future leaders," Hart-Wells said. "It is exciting to join an office as successful as the foundation's Office of Technology Commercialization and be given the opportunity to expand its scientific and economic impact locally, regionally and nationally."

Hart-Wells said she would like to focus on creating a branding campaign that will give the office an identity that promotes its contributions to the university's strategic plan and building strong, sustainable relationships with Purdue representatives and the business community.

Hart-Wells earned a doctorate in chemistry from Rice University in 2001 and a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Indiana University in 1993. She previously served as a Congressional Fellow for the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a patent agent for Fulbright & Jaworski LLP and a research associate for the National Academy of Sciences.

About Purdue Research Foundation

Purdue Research Foundation is a private, nonprofit foundation created to advance the mission of Purdue University. The foundation accepts gifts; administers trusts; funds research, scholarships and grants; acquires property; and negotiates research contracts on behalf of Purdue. In the 1990s, the foundation was charged with helping the university in the realm of economic development. The Purdue Research Foundation oversees the Purdue Research Park, which is the largest university-affiliated business incubator in the country. In addition to the Purdue Research Park of West Lafayette, the foundation has established technology parks in other locations around Indiana including Indianapolis, Merrillville and New Albany.

 

Contact:
Cynthia Sequin, 765-588-3340, [email protected]

Source:
Joseph B. Hornett, 765-588-1039, [email protected]

 

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