Press Release: BIO Statement on Confirmation of von Eschenbach as FDA Commissioner

BIO Statement on Confirmation of von Eschenbach as FDA Commissioner WASHINGTON, Dec. 7 -- Jim Greenwood, President and CEO of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO), issued the following statement on the Senate's confirmation of Andrew von Eschenbach, M.D., as Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA): "BIO applauds Majority Leader Bill Frist and Members of the U.S. Senate for moving forward to confirm Dr. Andrew von Eschenbach. He has served the nation well as the Acting Commissioner of the FDA. This confirmation will enable him to provide effective leadership and vision for the FDA and is a critical step toward strengthening the FDA. "Dr. von Eschenbach's experience as a urologic surgeon and oncologist and his leadership as director of the National Cancer Institute afford him unique insights into the critical need to advance new treatments for patients with life-threatening illnesses. As a teacher and academician, he appreciates the importance of education and research in achieving scientific breakthroughs. "BIO staff and member companies look forward to continuing our work with Dr. von Eschenbach to provide safe, effective and innovative products into the hands of patients and other consumers while assuring public confidence in these products." BIO represents more than 1,100 biotechnology companies, academic institutions, state biotechnology centers and related organizations across the United States and 31 other nations. BIO members are involved in the research and development of healthcare, agricultural, industrial and environmental biotechnology products. http://www.bio.org

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