Mylan Receives FDA Approval for Generic Version of Thyroid Deficiency Treatment Cytomel

Mylan Receives FDA Approval for Generic Version of Thyroid Deficiency Treatment Cytomel

PITTSBURGH, July 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Mylan Inc. (NASDAQ: MYL) today announced that its subsidiary Mylan Pharmaceuticals Inc. has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) for Liothyronine Sodium Tablets USP, 5 mcg (base), 25 mcg (base) and 50 mcg (base).

Liothyronine Sodium Tablets are the generic version of King Pharmaceuticals' thyroid deficiency treatment Cytomel®, which had total U.S. sales of approximately $54 million for the 12 months ending March 31 for the same strengths, according to IMS Health. Mylan has begun to ship this product.

Currently, Mylan has 120 ANDAs pending FDA approval representing $84.7 billion in annual brand sales, according to IMS Health. Thirty-five of these pending ANDAs are potential first-to-file opportunities, representing $16.6 billion in annual brand sales, according to IMS Health.

Mylan Inc., which provides products to customers in more than 140 countries and territories, ranks among the leading diversified generics and specialty pharmaceutical companies in the world. The company maintains one of the industry's broadest - and highest quality - product portfolios, supported by a robust product pipeline; owns a controlling interest in the world's third largest active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturer; and operates a specialty business focused on respiratory and allergy therapies. For more information, please visit www.mylan.com.

SOURCE Mylan Inc.

Suggested Articles

Genor Biopharma banked $160 million from the likes of Hillhouse and Temasek Holdings to advance its clinical-stage autoimmune and cancer programs.

Going from being the CSO of Bristol Myers Squibb to running one of the biggest cancer research organizations in the world is a major career shift.

Hahn made the commitment in a speech that called on the FDA to learn from the crisis to enact lasting policies that accelerate drug development.