Ligand to Present at the MDB Capital Group Bright Lights Conference on May 11

SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (NASDAQ: LGND) announced today that President and Chief Executive Officer John L. Higgins will present at the MDB Capital Group Bright Lights Conference on Tuesday, May 11, 2010, at 1:30 p.m. Eastern time (10:30 a.m. Pacific). The conference takes place at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco.

A live webcast of the presentation will be available on the Company’s website www.ligand.com. A replay of the presentation will be archived on the site for 30 days.

About Ligand Pharmaceuticals

Ligand discovers and develops new drugs that address critical unmet medical needs of patients for a broad spectrum of diseases including hepatitis, muscle wasting, Alzheimer's, inflammatory diseases, anemia, COPD, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoporosis. Ligand's proprietary drug discovery and development programs are based on advanced cell-based assays, gene-expression tools, ultra-high throughput screening and one of the world's largest combinatorial chemical libraries. Ligand has strategic alliances with major pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, including GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Pfizer, Roche, Bristol-Myers Squibb, and Cephalon and more than 30 programs are in various stages of development by its partners.



CONTACT:

Ligand Pharmaceuticals Incorporated
John L. Higgins, President and CEO
or
Erika Luib, Investor Relations
858-550-7896
or
Lippert/Heilshorn & Associates
Don Markley
310-691-7100
[email protected]

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  California

INDUSTRY KEYWORDS:   Health  Biotechnology  Pharmaceutical

MEDIA:

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