GE Healthcare Connects People through Music in Fight Against Breast Cancer with First Health Initiative powered by Spotify

GE Healthcare Connects People through Music in Fight Against Breast Cancer with First Health Initiative powered by Spotify

<0> Veronica BotetDigital and Social Media PR ManagerGE Healthcare+34 629 085281 </0>

Today GE Healthcare announced the launch of ‘Give a Little Beat’, a musical initiative and a first in the healthcare industry, to connect people in the fight against breast cancer through the power of music and social media. By visiting , users will be able to share and listen to songs from the online GE Healthcare’s Jukebox, powered by , the leading digital music service, in support of breast cancer patients and to raise awareness about the disease.

Much research has been done on the physical and emotional effects of music. According to the American Cancer Society, there is evidence that alongside conventional treatment, music therapy can help to reduce pain and relieve chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. It may also relieve stress and provide an overall sense of well-being. Some studies have found that music therapy can lower heart rate, blood pressure, and breathing rate.

“We are conscious of the healing power of music and its universal reach, which cuts through geographical and cultural barriers. We strongly believe that music and social media are the best way to connect people in the fight against breast cancer and to spread the powerful message that early detection can save lives”, said Jeff DeMarrais, GE Healthcare's Chief Communications Officer.

GE Healthcare pioneers ‘Give a Little Beat’ campaign, an open invitation to submit a song or listen to any of the songs from the “Hope”, “Love”, “Party” and “Shout” playlists on GE Healthcare’s Jukebox. People can participate by visiting or the ‘Give a Little Beat’ . Songs will be also shared through Twitter, and other social media platforms, with the #BCMBeats hashtag.

This initiative supplements the recent campaign announced by GE Healthcare to mobilize thousands of GE employees to form '' and visually demonstrate the global fight against the disease during October, Breast Cancer Awareness Month. It also reinforces the messages posted on GE’s , a dedicated site created to share stories from breast cancer survivors, family members and healthcare professionals to increase awareness around the disease and to inspire those who are going through a difficult time.

Come join us - GE Healthcare’s Jukebox is just getting started: the ‘Give a Little Beat’ for Breast Cancer campaign is the first of many inspiring initiatives powered by Spotify that the company will launch in the coming months.

American Cancer Society. Music Therapy. Retrieved Oct, 18 2012 from

BreastCancer.Org. Music Therapy. Retrieved Oct, 18 2012 from

GE Healthcare provides transformational medical technologies and services that are shaping a new age of patient care. Our broad expertise in medical imaging and information technologies, medical diagnostics, patient monitoring systems, drug discovery, biopharmaceutical manufacturing technologies, performance improvement and performance solutions services help our customers to deliver better care to more people around the world at a lower cost. In addition, we partner with healthcare leaders, striving to leverage the global policy change necessary to implement a successful shift to sustainable healthcare systems.

Our “healthymagination” vision for the future invites the world to join us on our journey as we continuously develop innovations focused on reducing costs, increasing access and improving quality around the world. Headquartered in the United Kingdom, GE Healthcare is a unit of General Electric Company (NYSE: GE). Worldwide, GE Healthcare employees are committed to serving healthcare professionals and their patients in more than 100 countries. . For our latest news, please visit

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