Chief Medical Officer Birgitte Volck To Leave Swedish Orphan Biovitrum

Swedish Orphan Biovitrum AB (publ) (Sobi) today announced that Birgitte Volck, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Vice President of Development and Chief Medical Officer (CMO) of Sobi, will leave the company to join the rare disease research group at GlaxoSmithKline as Head of R&D Rare Diseases. Birgitte will work through a six month notice period before leaving Sobi.

"We thank Birgitte for her leadership and dedication which has helped to evolve Sobi's patient oriented research and development organisation into a highly skilled international team", said Geoffrey McDonough, President and CEO of Sobi. "Birgitte joined Sobi in 2012 and has been instrumental in advancing Sobi's late stage development projects and in bringing new treatment options to people with rare diseases."

---

About Sobi

Sobi is an international specialty healthcare company dedicated to rare diseases. Sobi's mission is to develop and deliver innovative therapies and services to improve the lives of patients. The product portfolio is primarily focused on Haemophilia, Inflammation and Genetic diseases. Sobi also markets a portfolio of specialty and rare disease products for partner companies across Europe, the Middle East, North Africa and Russia. Sobi is a pioneer in biotechnology with world-class capabilities in protein biochemistry and biologics manufacturing. In 2014, Sobi had total revenues of SEK 2.6 billion (USD 380 M) and about 600 employees. The share (STO: SOBI) is listed on NASDAQ OMX Stockholm. More information is available at www.sobi.com.

Media relations
Oskar Bosson, Head of Communications
T: +46 70 410 71 80
[email protected]

Investor relations
Jörgen Winroth, Vice President, Head of Investor Relations
T: +1 347-224-0819, +1 212-579-0506, +46 8 697 2135
[email protected]

Suggested Articles

The notice comes weeks after Amgen revealed it was retreating from its East Coast neuroscience operations.

AstraZeneca is confident data generated across development show the antibody works despite a pivotal study missing its primary endpoint.

Reata’s bardoxolone improved kidney function in a phase 3 trial of patients with a rare form of chronic kidney disease.