CELLERIX APPOINTS JOSÉ LUIS BRAVO VP GLOBAL MEDICAL AND REGULATORY

CELLERIX APPOINTS JOSÉ LUIS BRAVO VP GLOBAL MEDICAL AND REGULATORY

Madrid, 1, December, 2009.- CELLERIX, a product-focused biopharmaceutical company which develops innovative medicines based on cell therapy, has appointed José Luis Bravo as Vice President Global Medical and Regulatory.

José Luis Bravo will be responsible for the medical department, clinical operations, regulatory issues and quality GCP.  In his new position, José Luis will join CELLERIX's Management Board and will report to Eduardo Bravo, CELLERIX's CEO.

José Luis has a PhD in Medicine and Surgery awarded by the Universidad Complutense de Madrid.  During the first four years of his professional career, José Luis practised medicine at several hospitals in Madrid.  In 1987 he started his career in the pharmaceutical industry.  During this extensive period José Luis has held several positions as Medical as well as Research and Development Director in several multinational companies including Janssen, Hoechst Marion Roussel, Dupont Pharmaceutical, Bristol Myers Squibb and Schwarz Pharma. Prior to joining CELLERIX he was Medical Director at UCB where he undertook the restructuring of the medical department following the merger between Schwarz Pharma and UCB.


Notes to the editor:
Cellerix is a biopharmaceutical company developing innovative medicines based on cell therapy. The company has three products undergoing clinical trials: Ontaril® (Cx401) for the treatment of perianal fistulas, currently in Phase III, Cx501 for skin regeneration, currently in Phase II and Cx601 for the treatment of perianal fistulas, in phase II. Ontaril®, Cx501 and Cx601 have been designated orphan status by the European Medicines Agency (EMEA).  For further information about Cellerix, please visit www.cellerix.com.

 

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