John Carroll

Biography for John Carroll

John D. Carroll, Editor-in-Chief

John D. Carroll is a biotech analyst with 34 years of prize-winning experience in journalism. Appointed editor of FierceBiotech in 2003, he has covered genomics, biotechnology, healthcare and other business topics for Managed Care, American Banker, Small Times, and Local Business.com, He has also contributed stories from Central America and Ireland to the Dallas Morning News and Time and wrote for the Houston Press and other leading publications. He spent six years as editor and publisher of the Dallas Business Journal, was publisher of Texas Business and early in his career was part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning team of reporters and editors at the Kansas City Star & Times. He enjoys hiking, traveling and spending time with his family. Carroll is based in Vermont and Texas and can be reached at john@fiercemarkets.com. Follow @JohnCFierce on Twitter.

Articles by John Carroll

Viamet drops IPO, spins out cancer drug as ex-Elan chief funds $60M round

Confronted by an increasingly tough group of biotech investors, Research Triangle Park, NC-based Viamet Pharmaceuticals has scrapped plans for an IPO, instead opting to grab a $60 million venture round to finance its development work on antifungals while spinning out one of its assets into a separate company. And it's working with one of the most controversial figures in biotech to push the company forward.

Roche blueprints a sprawling $1.8B R&D complex for pRED

They're building a new home for John Reed and Roche's pRED research group in Basel--and the pharma giant is thinking big. Roche said today that it is committing $1.8 billion to build a new research center in Switzerland that will encompass four new office and lab buildings to house 1,900 R&D staffers.

Cubist CEO Bonney hands over reins as new buyout rumors circulate

After 11 years at the helm of Cubist Pharmaceuticals, CEO Michael Bonney is stepping down and handing the reins to COO and President Robert Perez.

Celgene's $2.6B deal for Crohn's drug pays off with promising PhII

Celgene bet big on the little-known Irish biotech Nogra Pharma when it partnered on a mid-stage drug for Crohn's disease. And today Celgene spelled out the reasons why it gambled $710 million upfront on a Phase II drug, highlighting data that support a clear case that the therapy can help spur clinical remission in a broad group of patients.

Top 10 Phase III disasters of 2014

Welcome to the hall of shame, where blockbuster drug projections go to die. This list includes some drugs that clearly should never have wound up in Phase III to begin with, a few that were steered back to the clinic in a doomed attempt to mine something positive, and a couple of notable exceptions that may have helped advance the field by exploring the outer limits of new drug technology.

Genentech pays $150M upfront to partner on NewLink's immuno-oncology drug

Biotech powerhouse Genentech is going all in with Ames, IA-based NewLink Genetics, partnering on an early-stage cancer program which has been billed as an important example of a new class of checkpoint inhibitor. And Genentech says that it plans to build a portfolio of programs pairing this therapeutic with Roche's closely watched PD-L1 drug.

VC's biotech investing slips in Q3, but '14 still looks like a record-breaker

Last quarter biotech attracted a whopping $1.8 billion in new venture cash, the biggest quarter since 2005.

Canaan debuts $675M fund with an eye for biotech, med tech deals

Today Menlo Park, CA-based Canaan is rolling out a new fund, its 10th, with $675 million to invest in new companies--about a third of which will be devoted to biotech and healthcare.

J&J adds an $817M cancer drug pact with ambitious Aduro

A banner year for Berkeley, CA-based Aduro just got better. The biotech has inked its second licensing pact of the year with Johnson & Johnson, which kicked in a $30 million upfront and boosted its total milestone package to the $1 billion-plus category.

AbbVie cuts and runs from $55B Shire deal, signaling retreat from tax inversions

After first vowing to see the merger through despite new tax rules designed to make a merger much more difficult, AbbVie's board publicly hesitated yesterday and then early this morning recommended against going through with the tie-up, essentially killing the deal.