John Carroll

Biography for John Carroll

John D. Carroll, Editor-in-Chief

John D. Carroll is a biotech analyst with 36 years of experience in journalism that’s taken him all over the world--and back again. Appointed editor of FierceBiotech in 2003, he has covered everything from city hall in Kansas City, KS, to biotech in London. He contributed stories from Central America and Ireland to the Dallas Morning News and Time and wrote for the Houston Press and a medley of other publications. He spent six years as editor and then publisher of the Dallas Business Journal, was publisher of Texas Business for a brief stint and early in his career was part of a big team of reporters and editors at the Kansas City Star & Times that investigated the deadly 1981 disaster at a local Hyatt Regency. The newspapers won a 1982 Pulitzer for their collective work. Carroll lives in Vermont and travels frequently. He can be reached at john@fiercemarkets.com. Follow @JohnCFierce on Twitter.

Articles by John Carroll

HIV investigators at Harvard, J&J see promise in early-stage vaccine

A team of collaborators drawn from Harvard, Johnson & Johnson and other groups published results from a preclinical animal study Thursday afternoon that underscores the potential for developing the world's first HIV vaccine.

Ex-Pharmacyclics team raises $33.5M for checkpoint drug

Ex-Pharmacyclics CEO Richard Miller is looking for a second act in biotech with his startup Corvus Pharmaceuticals.

A booming Celgene grabs Merck's abandoned campus in New Jersey

Fresh off a landmark $1 billion deal to buy into Juno's immuno-oncology pipeline, fast-growing Celgene has inked another contract to buy up Merck's sprawling old campus in Summit, NJ.

Four years after buyout, Pfizer spins Icagen ion channel platform back out

Four years ago, Pfizer spent $56 million to bag Icagen and add its ion channel R&D platform and pipeline in North Carolina with its pain drug development arm in the U.K. But yesterday the pharma giant spun the platform back out to a small contract research group in Cambridge, MA, called XRPro Sciences, which will now combine its operations into an expanded research services operation that will cater to the biopharma industry.

UPDATED: Biogen beefs up gene therapy ops with $1B-plus AGTC pact

Biogen has taken another big step in building its new gene therapy operations, inking a comprehensive $1 billion-plus partnership--including an upfront of $124 million--with the Florida-based biotech AGTC on a few new programs for rare eye diseases.

FDA taps the brakes on Genentech's cobimetinib review

The FDA has opted to delay its review of cobimetinib in order to give regulators more time to consider additional Phase III data provided by Genentech.

Roche forced to concede another flop for Alzheimer's program

You can score another setback for Roche's star-crossed attempt to develop a new drug for Alzheimer's. Roche partner Evotec reported that their drug sembragiline failed a Phase IIB study.

Whittled down to biotech size, AstraZeneca's antibiotics crew starts over as Entasis

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot made it clear back in early 2014 that he planned to spin off a big chunk of the company's anti-infectives pipeline along with the neurosciences side of R&D. And now more than a year later the pharma company has completed the task, hatcheting down a once large group of researchers and birthing a small biotech with its own pipeline of antibiotics and a core group of investigators.

Biotech billionaire Soon-Shiong plots a second IPO--this time for NantHealth

Biotech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong has already laid the foundation for a big IPO to help finance his low-profile oncology R&D player Conkwest. Now he's moving closer to getting his high-profile personalized drug-finding company NantHealth on the market as well.

Is Celgene killing the traditional biotech partnering formula?

Celgene's $1 billion front-loaded deal to buy into Juno's CAR-T and TCR programs--$150 million upfront and $850 million for 10% of the company's stock at more than double the going share price--instantly and predictably spurred a backlash among some of the top analysts in the industry over the frothy figures in play.